FRBs in the news again

Fast Radio Bursts are one of my favourite astronomical phenomena, because their cause or origin is still completely unknown. They are very short bursts of radio-frequency radiation, lasting just a few milliseconds, but of colossal intensity. There have been only about 37 catalogued to date, all one-offs except FRB 121102.

FRB121102 is a “repeater” – a series of bursts were observed coming from the same source in 2012, then again on several days in 2015, and 15 more bursts during 30 minutes in 2017. The origin appears to be a galaxy about 2 billion light years away.

Although spinning black holes and neutron stars are possible candidate for generating the FRBs, there is no regularity of pulse in the transmissions as there is with spinning pulsars. One outside, but not discounted, possibility is that the source of the FRBs is some sort of extraterrestrial intelligent action – an attempt at communication or the utilisation of power for some purpose.

The new news is that researchers have re-analysed the data fromĀ August 26, 2017, when 21 bursts were detected, and they have found another 72 pulses by using AI – a convolutional neural network.

Link to Research paper

Link to Space.com article

Update 8th Jan 2019: A new Canadian Observatory called CHIME has reported finding another 13 FRBs including another repeater.

Update 14th February 2019: Observations reported today suggest that Superluminous Supernovae give rise to magnetars that then emit FRBs. More observations to follow.

Scientific American article

Advertisements